Blog, She Wrote http://blogshewrote.org Embracing the Independent & Authentic Nature of Homeschooling Wed, 25 Feb 2015 11:00:14 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.1.1 Finishing Strong- Homeschooling the Middle & High School Years Week 44http://blogshewrote.org/2015/02/25/finishing-strong-homeschooling-the-middle-high-school-years-week-44/ http://blogshewrote.org/2015/02/25/finishing-strong-homeschooling-the-middle-high-school-years-week-44/#respond Wed, 25 Feb 2015 11:00:14 +0000 http://blogshewrote.org/?p=17216 Happy Wednesday and welcome to Finishing Strong. We are a link up that supports families as they homeschool their middle & high school children. Make sure to visit our co-hosts: Aspired Living, Blog, She Wrote, Education Possible, Eva Varga, & Starts at Eight As our kids grow, we are given unique insight in to their […]

The post Finishing Strong- Homeschooling the Middle & High School Years Week 44 appeared first on Blog, She Wrote.

]]>
Happy Wednesday and welcome to Finishing Strong. We are a link up that supports families as they homeschool their middle & high school children.

Finishing Strong ~ Homeschooling the Middle & High School Years #44

Make sure to visit our co-hosts: Aspired Living, Blog, She Wrote, Education Possible, Eva Varga, & Starts at Eight

As our kids grow, we are given unique insight in to their passions and potential future goals. Recently, a number of bloggers shared their personal experiences raising children with distinct paths and interests.

Not only were they fun to read, but they were also some of our most popular links from last week.

How to Grow a Reader from Blog, She Wrote

Growing an Introverted Warrior from Education Possible

Growing a Musician from Eva Varga

Homeschooling a Horse Lover from Our Journey Westward

4 Tips for Raising a Crafty Kid from The Sunny Patch

What makes your child one-of-a-kind? What endeavors are you fostering while homeschooling your teen?

We would love to hear about your family’s experience teaching middle & high schoolers at home, so link up with us below.

Bloggers, by linking up, you may be featured on our co-hosts’ social media pages or our Pinterest board. We may even select you to be featured in a future post!

Guidelines for the hop:

  1. Link up to 3 posts from your blog. Make sure you use the exact URL to the post, not to your home page. You can add any post related to homeschooling middle and high school students. Posts unrelated to that will be removed.
  2. Please no advertising, individual Pinterest pins, Facebook, Twitter, or other link-up links!
  3. Grab our button to add to your post after you link it up. Each week we will be choosing our favorite posts to highlight on all 5 sites. If you were featured, make sure you add an “I was featured” button.
  4. The linky will go live on each co-host’s blog each Wednesday at 6am EST, and will be live until Tuesday at 11:55 pm.

Share the love.

Add our button to your post.

Homeschooling the Middle & High School Years

Was your post featured?

Grab an “I was featured” button!

Homeschooling the Middle & High School Years

We love people who SHARE WITH US!

*By linking up, you agree for us to share your images, always with credit!

So tell us, what have you been up to?

We want to see your best posts that focus on homeschooling middle & high school students. Share your ideas, unique learning approaches, and encouragement.

 Loading InLinkz ...
facebooktwittergoogle_pluspinterestmailby feather

The post Finishing Strong- Homeschooling the Middle & High School Years Week 44 appeared first on Blog, She Wrote.

]]> http://blogshewrote.org/2015/02/25/finishing-strong-homeschooling-the-middle-high-school-years-week-44/feed/ 0 Trail Planning Using Topographic Quadrangle Mapshttp://blogshewrote.org/2015/02/24/trail-planning-using-topographic-quadrangle-maps/ http://blogshewrote.org/2015/02/24/trail-planning-using-topographic-quadrangle-maps/#respond Tue, 24 Feb 2015 11:00:37 +0000 http://blogshewrote.org/?p=17182 This post contains affiliate links. Thanks for your support! This year our high schoolers are taking Earth Science. Typically, earth science is a middle school course, but in NY it’s a high school requirement. So, I set out to find some high school level earth science activities. I came across a NY website for science […]

The post Trail Planning Using Topographic Quadrangle Maps appeared first on Blog, She Wrote.

]]>
Blog, She Wrote Trail Planning Using Topographic Quadrangle Maps

This post contains affiliate links. Thanks for your support!

This year our high schoolers are taking Earth Science. Typically, earth science is a middle school course, but in NY it’s a high school requirement. So, I set out to find some high school level earth science activities. I came across a NY website for science teachers and modified an activity to suit our needs. Our kids enjoyed Trail Planning Using Topographic Quandrangle Maps.

Topographic Maps in Geography & Earth Science

Topographical maps are useful in both geography and earth science. Typically, in earth science students learn to work with and make their own topo maps while in geography students spend time interpreting the topo maps. In NorthStar Geography by Bright Ideas Press, topographical maps are in lesson five on topography. In addition to the activities found there, the USGS site has some challenging exercises for topographers.

What Is a USGS Quadrangle Map?

The United States Geological Survey (USGS) makes maps available on their website. The USGS is a science organization which provides information on the health of our ecosystems and environment along with information on natural hazards and our natural resources. They are also in the business of cartography (map making). Quadrangle maps are available for free download from the USGS.

  • Shows elevation and other features of the land
  • Historic topo maps can show physical and cultural features of an area at a certain point in time- you can see how an area looked before development
  • Used by recreationists- great for hikers & cross country skiers
  • Helpful when you are looking to by land for building or buying a home- gives a good idea of drainage and don’t forget to visit when it rains!

Blog, She Wrote Trail Planning Using Topographic Quandrant Maps

Trail Building with a USGS Quadrangle Map Reference

The task was to plan a new recreational trail within the area of the quadrangle map using a few criteria:

  • Must be easily accessible from the road & include parking
  • Four different habitats must be present along the trail
  • Establish two new trails
  • Include a picnic area
  • Beginner Trails- are defined by a distance less than 5 miles, looped trail, no gradients larger than 150 ft per mile
  • Advanced Trails- are defined by a distance 5-10 miles long, begin and end at a park access road, no gradients larger than 500 ft per mile
  • Turn in a hand drawn map of the trail and surrounding area with labels
  • Include a data sheet with a key listing out the criteria met on the map

Some of the challenges include interpreting the quadrangle map and following the guidelines to complete the task within the parameters. The results of this assignment were delightful!

More Posts on Topography at Blog, She Wrote

Teaching Geography with Earth Science

We’ve been working with maps a lot this year. Here are a few related posts:

Maps are fun for our family and topographic maps add a special challenge to map adventures. Find yours with your kids today!

North Star Geography homeschool curriculum

 

facebooktwittergoogle_pluspinterestmailby feather

The post Trail Planning Using Topographic Quadrangle Maps appeared first on Blog, She Wrote.

]]>
http://blogshewrote.org/2015/02/24/trail-planning-using-topographic-quadrangle-maps/feed/ 0
Should My Homeschooled Teen Get a Part Time Job?http://blogshewrote.org/2015/02/20/should-my-homeschooled-teen-get-a-part-time-job/ http://blogshewrote.org/2015/02/20/should-my-homeschooled-teen-get-a-part-time-job/#comments Fri, 20 Feb 2015 11:00:58 +0000 http://blogshewrote.org/?p=17158 Last year our oldest wanted to get his first job so he could earn the money for a writing conference he wanted to attend. NY is a long way from Kansas, so even outside of the conference cost, transportation in getting there was not insignificant. My husband made a deal with Ethan. He said if […]

The post Should My Homeschooled Teen Get a Part Time Job? appeared first on Blog, She Wrote.

]]>
Blog, She Wrote Should My Homeschooled Teen Get a Part Time Job?

Last year our oldest wanted to get his first job so he could earn the money for a writing conference he wanted to attend. NY is a long way from Kansas, so even outside of the conference cost, transportation in getting there was not insignificant. My husband made a deal with Ethan. He said if Ethan could earn the money for the workshop itself, including room and board for the week, he would make sure Ethan got to Kansas.

Ethan accepted the challenge and began his search for paid work. He reached out to a family friend for continued yard work. He offered his services to a local MOPS group for their paid childcare. And he applied to a local grocery store about a mile away from our home. All three contacted him at once and he took them all on. Aside from the two smaller jobs, he began working as a cashier at a grocery store.

He had to learn quickly how to balance three jobs and his school work! But, in the end, he earned the money he needed (along with a gift from his grandparents which he was allowed to accept after earning a certain amount on his own) with in a few months- in time to sign up for the workshop. In turn, Dan took the week off from work, rented a car, and drove Ethan out to Kansas for a great week.

How do you answer the question, Should My Homeschooled Teen Get a Part Time Job?

Benefits of a Part Time Job

There are so many benefits to a teen having a part time job. Some of them are obvious like having the opportunity to make money! Some may not be so obvious or some may not see them as benefits. With a job, a teen can learn:

  • Skills of a part time job
  • How to work with the public- this is a skill which goes a long way. I could do a whole post just on the stories he brings home. It was quite entertaining those first few months. He even had a marriage proposal in his checkout line!
  • Work with others who are not like you- the homeschooling community can be fairly homogenous. He’s met all kinds of people both as coworkers and customers.
  • How to work with all kinds of bosses
  • Practices interview skills- we made Ethan practice counting back change to prepare for his interview at the grocery store!
  • Independence
  • Work with personal finances- let’s face it, they will earn a lot of money! (for a teen with no other real expenses)
  • Balance work with academics and fun
  • Allows teens to make a goal and meet it
  • Gives work experience in general- which looks great on college applications, particularly from a homeschooler

Challenges of a Part Time Job

There are some challenges which come with a teen having a regular job. Make sure to consider his situation before deciding together whether or not it’s a good idea at any particular time. For example,

  • Everyone isn’t like you and learning to work together can be difficult.
  • Bosses are not always easy to work for…or nice
  • Adjusting to a work schedule
  • Balancing other pursuits with a work schedule- learning when to ask off and when to know not to
  • Building physical stamina for the job- being on your feet all day or for several hours takes time to get used to. Even as a teacher, I was always so tired the first week back to school.
  • Transportation- which needs to be a factor in choosing where you will apply for a job. We chose a store about a mile away in a small strip mall so that getting him there and back would not always need to be done by us.

Should My Homeschooled Teen Get a Part Time Job?

How Do I Know If It’s The Right Thing for My Teen?

A job isn’t right for every teen and not every job is right for every teen. You have to know your teen and have a decent guess that the job they would do. Does your teen fit any of these descriptions?

  • Does your teen want to meet a financial goal?
  • Ready for a step up in independence
  • Could use some practice at fulfilling responsibility- Our son could use some tightening up of his schedule in order to help use his time better.
  • Has an interest in a field where there is an opportunity to work- even volunteer work at a place of interest can lead to employment later on.

Our Experience with The Part Time Job

So, once Ethan was working for a time and he began meeting his goals how was it going?

  • Reached his financial goal- He wanted to earn money for a writing workshop many miles away and the job helped him to meet the goal quickly.
  • Achieved his academic goal- Being successful with the financial goal meant reaching his academic goal and he attended the summer writing workshop.
  • Learned to work for difficult people- There’s a lot of turnover in this store and it’s not always easy, but he stuck with it.
  • Experience first hand that people aren’t always the same as you are- he knew this in his head, but it’s been a good experience for him to see that not everyone is like us and our family. It’s given him a whole new appreciation for us!
  • Given him independence- this job is his thing. Based on his proximity to the store, he can walk, ride a bike, or take the bus. All of these mean he doesn’t have to rely on us (though he does like door to door service).
  • Taught some good financial lessons- He’s able to make his own decisions regarding spending as we help him to practice saving, tithing, and spending. However, outside of engaging/purchasing something off limits, we let him choose how he spends it. Lots of lessons here!
  • Practiced responsibility and maturity- He’s stepped it up to be at work and to keep track of his schedule. He’s grown a lot from having the job.

What Have We Learned As Parents of a Teen with a Job?

We learned a lot from this experience as parents. Some of them took me by surprise.

  • This job is our son’s- It’s not ours. It’s his gig and his responsibility.
  • We helped him to navigate difficult situations- From home. Since it is his job, it is important not to run interference which is a new thing for us as parents of teens, right?
  • Make sure you know the labor laws for teens- Does your state require “working papers”? In the 80s, working papers were not a thing. Find out how often and how many hours they can work at 15-17 years old. In NY, one set of laws covers 14-15 year olds and there’s another for 16-17 year olds. We had to provide a physical form from our doctor and other proof of age and register him as a working teen with the school nurse at our local high school. Once your teen turns 16, they get a new form and that very day must report for a new set of working papers before they can work another shift at work.
  • Homeschooled teens can only work when public schooled teens can work- Resist the urge to have them work during school hours because it’s against the law. This was actually one issue we worked very closely with Ethan on because he was being scheduled during school hours. He was successful in making sure he was schedule during non-school hours, but just remember, the employer will not always pay attention to this piece of the law.
  • Not everyone thought it was a good idea- to have our son work. This is the one that surprised me. We actually got a lot of comments from our peers questioning us on the decision to allow him to work. When we were teens, many of us had jobs. Have you noticed that not as many teens work in high school? Academic pursuits have favor over part time work and I had so many people ask me why he was working. Because he likes money was my regular answer, but I often want to ask back, “Why not?” And, as one commenter pointed out, activities are an issue as well. But, I’ll save that discussion for another post!

In the end, Ethan was proud to have met his goal last year and we were proud of him as well. He worked at the store until mid-September, when I did break the interference rule and took his series of medical leave papers to his bosses. Unfortunately, he was diagnosed with Lyme Disease which he’d had for six months before a diagnosis. He spent several months this fall as a very sick teen, unable to work.

He is excited for the chance to return, but he is still recovering and is experiencing significant Post Treatment Lyme Syndrome. Perhaps I will blog about it one day, but for now just know that it is a long road back to feeling normal. He’s a good sport and we are still very proud of him!

So, do your homeschool teens work at part time jobs?

facebooktwittergoogle_pluspinterestmailby feather

The post Should My Homeschooled Teen Get a Part Time Job? appeared first on Blog, She Wrote.

]]>
http://blogshewrote.org/2015/02/20/should-my-homeschooled-teen-get-a-part-time-job/feed/ 13
Making Edible Mapshttp://blogshewrote.org/2015/02/19/making-edible-maps/ http://blogshewrote.org/2015/02/19/making-edible-maps/#comments Thu, 19 Feb 2015 11:00:45 +0000 http://blogshewrote.org/?p=17070 With a homeschooling spread of high school to elementary school, it’s fun now and then to work on an activity together. Long gone are the days of working all together all the time, but we come together whenever we can throughout the week. Making Edible Maps was perfect for my seafaring  younger boys and our […]

The post Making Edible Maps appeared first on Blog, She Wrote.

]]>
Blog, She Wrote Making Edible Maps

With a homeschooling spread of high school to elementary school, it’s fun now and then to work on an activity together. Long gone are the days of working all together all the time, but we come together whenever we can throughout the week. Making Edible Maps was perfect for my seafaring  younger boys and our geography and earth science studying high schoolers.

Choose Your Map Medium

Blog, She Wrote Making Edible Maps

You could go with a salt dough recipe and mold the topography right into the making of the map itself, or you could go with a cookie dough recipe. In the end, my 11th grader suggested it would be a lot more fun to eat the map than to watch it crumble in a corner later on. He and I are always pragmatic.

  • Salt Dough- Allows you to mold the land features like you would with playdough or clay. You can also paint the finished map. Storage when complete must be considered.
  • Cookie Dough- Edible so long term storage is not necessary. Topographical features are outlined by the drawings on the top of the cookie rather than molded. Instead of painting, you can decorate with icing and other food items.

Either way, I think the take home message here is to make the time to explore something in a fun way. Even when you have high schoolers. When my kids were all little, it was great fun to take an afternoon for something like this. It’s a great learning activity which engages younger kids for a long time. Now it’s fun because they can do it all themselves and I can leave decisions up to them and they get to enjoy it. I get to have fun watching and chatting! When it comes to hands on activities, I have rule of thumb.

Never spend more time on prepping for an activity than your kids will spend doing the activity.

I know some homeschooling moms like to put a lot of time into preparing lots of great activities, but I am very careful on where that energy is spent. If I know a concept is not a major one or that my kids really already get it, I won’t spend the time on it. If they need more help, then it might be worth the time. I found it frustrating when my kids were younger to spend a ton of time preparing games, etc only to see them master the concept in a flash and the activity or the game to quickly become obsolete. So, evaluate where your time is best spent. An edible map combines cooking skills and makes for a fun activity without a lot of mom prep time. That’s a win.

The Cookie Recipe

We used a chocolate chip cookie recipe and made a double batch (measurements for double batch are below) which the kids split once the sheets were baked. It was a nice consistency for map building.

  • 2 cups Crisco shortening
  • 1.5 cups white sugar
  • 1/5 cups brown sugar
  • 4 eggs
  • 2 tsp baking soda
  • 2 tsp salt
  • 4 tsp imitation vanilla
  • 6 cups flour

If you want to make the cookies then you can substitute one cup of oatmeal for one cup of the flour and you’ll want a 12 oz bag of chocolate chips. If you want giant flat cookie maps, then leave out the chips and oatmeal.

Grease a baking sheet and bake the sheet cookies at 350* for 9-10 minutes. We used 2 half sheets for baking pans and cut them in half after baking, giving us four maps.

Of course, the quick homeschool mom alternative is to purchase ready made cookie dough or at least the kind in the bag you just mix with liquids. There’s no shame in that!

Choose Your Map

Blog, She Wrote Making Edible Maps

Now that the basic landscape is ready, it’s time to get serious about the area featured on your map. Your students can choose a variety of areas to focus on. For example:

  • Continent- this would be a wider scale area for this medium, but the mountain ranges and sea level areas would be easy to see.
  • Country- choose a favorite or some other place you are studying this year
  • State- wonderful idea for state geography
  • National or State park – Niagara Falls would be interesting in salt or cookie dough, don’t you think?
  • Local Quandrangle- our high schoolers recently did a project in earth science involving our local area using a USGS map (see link below)
  • Fictional Location- what fun to map a world they love in stories. This is a great way to engage kids with books and Grow a Reader.

In the end, of our kids chose to make an edible map of a fantasy world they love. Are your kids creating or immersing themselves in other worlds? Chances are they contain some of the same geographical features you want your kids to notice and remember in this world.

Add Topographic Features to Your Map

Blog, She Wrote Making Edible Maps

My kids are old enough now that I let them decide where to take this. Projects are a lot of fun when you don’t feel like you have to micromanage! If you are doing a salt dough map you’ll be representing topography with the dough itself and painting details. With an edible map, our kids chose icing and other fun edibles to depict the features on their maps. Here are some things they chose to include:

  • mountains
  • bodies of water
  • gorges
  • forests
  • fields
  • volcanoes
  • marshes
  • bogs
  • lakes

Some kids chose to use icing of various colors and others used chocolate chips, sprinkles, and squeezable decorator tubes to make the designs. I didn’t do any special shopping for this project, they used what we had on hand. They had fun hunting for items they could use and improvising.

More Topographic Map Links

We’re doing Earth Science this year in conjunction with NorthStar Geography and this is one of the fun activities adapted from the chapter on Topography. It’s been a good combination for us to approach physical geography from the perspective of Earth Science. How do you study physical geography?

North Star Geography & WonderMaps Combo

 

facebooktwittergoogle_pluspinterestmailby feather

The post Making Edible Maps appeared first on Blog, She Wrote.

]]>
http://blogshewrote.org/2015/02/19/making-edible-maps/feed/ 1
Finishing Strong – Homeschooling the Middle & High School Years Week 43http://blogshewrote.org/2015/02/18/finishing-strong-homeschooling-the-middle-high-school-years-week-43/ http://blogshewrote.org/2015/02/18/finishing-strong-homeschooling-the-middle-high-school-years-week-43/#comments Wed, 18 Feb 2015 11:00:14 +0000 http://blogshewrote.org/?p=17147 Are you one of the many families homeschooling teens? If so, then we’re happy you found us. Finishing Strong is a weekly link-up that’s all about sharing ideas and inspiring each other, helping us all thrive during this season of teaching older kids at home. Finishing Strong is co-hosted by: Aspired Living, Blog She Wrote, […]

The post Finishing Strong – Homeschooling the Middle & High School Years Week 43 appeared first on Blog, She Wrote.

]]>
Finishing Strong ~ Homeschooling the Middle & High School Years #43

Are you one of the many families homeschooling teens? If so, then we’re happy you found us.

Finishing Strong is a weekly link-up that’s all about sharing ideas and inspiring each other, helping us all thrive during this season of teaching older kids at home.

Finishing Strong is co-hosted by: Aspired Living, Blog She Wrote, Education Possible, Eva Varga, & Starts at Eight

Our readers loved these three posts from last week. What did you think?

100 Books You Should Read by the Time You Turn 20 from Blog, She Wrote

Great Family Books to Read Aloud from Sweetness & Light

Keeping Your Sanity While Homeschooling Teens from Weird, Unsocialized Homeschoolers

Don’t forget to share your own middle & high school posts below.

Bloggers, by linking up, you may be featured on our co-hosts’ social media pages or our Pinterest board. We may even select you to be featured in a future post!

Guidelines for the hop:

  1. Link up to 3 posts from your blog. Make sure you use the exact URL to the post, not to your home page. You can add any post related to homeschooling middle and high school students. Posts unrelated to that will be removed.
  2. Please no advertising, individual Pinterest pins, Facebook, Twitter, or other link-up links!
  3. Grab our button to add to your post after you link it up. Each week we will be choosing our favorite posts to highlight on all 5 sites. If you were featured, make sure you add an “I was featured” button.
  4. The linky will go live on each co-host’s blog each Wednesday at 6am EST, and will be live until Tuesday at 11:55 pm.

Share the love.

Add our button to your post.

Homeschooling the Middle & High School Years

Was your post featured?

Grab an “I was featured” button!

Homeschooling the Middle & High School Years

*By linking up, you agree for us to share your images, always with credit!

We love people who SHARE WITH US!

 Loading InLinkz ...
facebooktwittergoogle_pluspinterestmailby feather

The post Finishing Strong – Homeschooling the Middle & High School Years Week 43 appeared first on Blog, She Wrote.

]]>
http://blogshewrote.org/2015/02/18/finishing-strong-homeschooling-the-middle-high-school-years-week-43/feed/ 2
How to Grow a Readerhttp://blogshewrote.org/2015/02/16/growing-reader/ http://blogshewrote.org/2015/02/16/growing-reader/#comments Mon, 16 Feb 2015 11:00:20 +0000 http://blogshewrote.org/?p=17075 My guess is that as homeschooling parents, we all want to have great readers. Isn’t it the first milestone a homeschooling parent needs to meet? The inevitable, “Is she reading yet?”. We have four excellent readers in our house and while the jury is out on a great many things about our kids, reading is […]

The post How to Grow a Reader appeared first on Blog, She Wrote.

]]>
Blog, She Wrote How to Grow a Reader

My guess is that as homeschooling parents, we all want to have great readers. Isn’t it the first milestone a homeschooling parent needs to meet? The inevitable, “Is she reading yet?”. We have four excellent readers in our house and while the jury is out on a great many things about our kids, reading is mission accomplished! Today’s post is all about How to Grow a Reader.

Babies, Toddlers, & Books

Books have been a large part of our family culture since our first son was a newborn. Spending time with your babies and toddlers with books gives them the best start possible to becoming readers themselves. It’s one of the most important things we can do as new parents, but it is often overlooked until kids are older.

  • Read aloud to your babies- Since Ethan (who is now 16) was a brand new baby, we’ve been reading to him. Listening to the sound of your voice and snuggling or even during the dreaded “belly time”, is an all time favorite of babies. Stories are wonderful when you’ve run out of things to say!
  • Be friends with books and teach babies how to be kind to books- We talked a lot about how to treat books when our kids were babies and though we have many books with worn covers due to being read a lot, our babies didn’t mistreat books. It might seem silly, but from the start we spent time teaching our babies and toddlers how to treat books. You could often find them flipping through a story and showing off pictures.
  • Have fun with books- We were always playing, singing, and inventing activities to go with books. When our 16yo was 2, I would make felt activity sets for his favorite books and I made sure to include the thing about a book he loved the most.

Preschoolers and Books

As your toddlers grow into preschoolers, keep playing with books. Making stories come alive is fun and it helps kids to enjoy books and the stories within them.

  • Play Out Stories- Do you remember the Playhouse Disney Show, Out of the Box? In it, the hosts would bring children into the story by playing games, listening to the story, building craft props, and acting out the story. It was a whole show about a story world and it engaged kids. We did this all the time on our own with our children’s favorite stories.
  • How to Spend Time with Preschoolers- Activities for preschoolers including a large section on books. You’ll find some fun book specific activities to make and enjoy. This is an older post which could stand an update.
  • Enjoy playing with books- Use books such as Before Five in a Row, Five in a Row, and Picture Book Activities have wonderful ideas for enjoying books with children whether it’s crafts or snacks or fun games and songs.

Blog, She Wrote Growing a Reader

Elementary Age Children & Books

This is the age where children will begin to read on their own (some preschoolers do begin to read as well) and it’s a time for continuing to enjoy stories while reading instruction is taking place. How do you enjoy books with students from ages 6-10?

  • Require kids to read- Why are we so afraid of this? Practice gets us closer to perfect and reading is a skill that must be practiced, whether our children enjoy it or not.
  • Improve fluency- Once students have mastered phonics, the goal is increased fluency. The mechanics of reading have been figured out and it’s time to practice and get better. How to Turn Emergent Readers into Super Readers gives perspective and lots of ideas on how to do this.
  • Read aloud- Honestly, this is the single best thing that you can do for students of any age. Even when they are working on their own reading skills, they can listen to elaborate stories in fun settings with great adventure. It raises vocabulary levels and keeps kids interested in the goal of reading on their own. Don’t feel like you have to stick with one story. Have several going at once. It’s an investment of time that pays back big dividends.
  • Immerse kids in the story world- Find ways to brings stories to life. Make crafts, play pretend, try out something from a book like cooking a meal in the story or building a secret hideout.
  • Talk about stories- This is a great way to bring dad in on the fun. Tell updates at the dinner table and find out what everyone thinks will happen next.
  • The Role of Non-fiction- Teach your kids to use non-fiction reference books. Start with topics they love and expand to help them discover new things. Google is great for a reference sometimes, but having a whole book devoted to a topic is worth the cost both in dollars and in space.

 Middle Grade Students & Books

Blog, She Wrote How to Grow a Reader

By the time children are in middle school, they likely have been reading on their own for some time. It’s important at this stage to up the ante on difficulty. Seek out books which challenge your kids on several levels such as readability and topic.

  • Assign more difficult books- This is a great time to begin introducing more classic literature if you haven’t already.
  • Start a book club- Book clubs give kids incentive to try books outside of their comfort zone. We’ve been hosting a girl’s book club for almost two years and they’ve read a lot of books they might not read on their own.
  • Try book projects- Our 14yo daughter has been doing historical fashion projects and one of her first was with a steampunk gown made while she was reading Around the World in 80 Days and learning about Jules Verne. The Jules Verne study of literature, fashion, and history was a fun way to introduce lots of Verne which she did read beyond the required books. It also produced some wonderful results in the steampunk gown.
  • Find out more about an author & the book’s context- This is a great idea for tougher books. Right now our daughter, who is ninth grade, is reading Wuthering Heights for the book club. One of our other member moms is a great cheerleader and often brings resources to give the girls new insights to difficult books.
  • Keep talking about books! We talk about the books our kids are reading all the time. Ages 11-13 is a great time to extend the conversation beyond simple narration. You can talk to your kids about ideas and intentions and what they think about a character’s behavior.

High Schoolers & Books

As our young children become high school students, we still play with books. It looks different than it did when they played out stories, but we still spend time in story worlds.

  • Story analysis- One of the most important skills we can give our homeschool graduates is the ability to analyze text and write about books. Comparing two and synthesizing an opinion is probably the thing I did most in graduate school and if you are studying anything but science in an undergraduate program, your college students need to be able to do this well.
  • Book discussions- By high school, you can have long conversations on books and for parents it’s a great way to communicate with your teen about all sorts of things in those final years at home. I’m preparing a post on discussions because I think it’s important and not all parents feel equipped to take advantage of these moments.
  • Introduce Controversial Books- No, I’m not talking about explicit content, but I am saying try not to avoid anything questionable such as Dracula or Frankenstein. Classic literature isn’t always in line with our values, but it does give us excellent talking points with our high schoolers.
  • Book Clubs- Again, these provide prescribed books and discussions which can open up new worlds to more reserved readers and gives them a chance to talk about books with peers.
  • Literature Studies- High school offers the opportunity to take on studies of literature in a more formal way. We use Excellence in Literature and our 11th grader is taking a Potter School class on Fantasy & Science Fiction literature. He adores this class.
  • Writing their own stories & Creating their own other worlds- This is a fun idea whether you have a natural writer or not. Extending story ideas or writing fan fiction is one way to enjoy a story world. Do you have a writer?

Measuring Success as a Reader

So, how do you know if your kid is a big reader? I bet many of you with older kids might say, “But my kid doesn’t like to read”. We think of readers as book worms with their noses in a book all the time. Sometimes it doesn’t look like that. You have a reader if:

  • Assigned reading is completed- and can be narrated successfully
  • There is reading for information- this is my own “go to” for reading. I rarely read just for pleasure. I read for information and to be able to communicate with my kids on books. If your child reads to complete a task or investigates on his own by reading, this is being a reader!
  • Reading for book club- or another outside motivator (but not always for tangible rewards)

Not everyone who can read well enjoys reading all the time. And that’s ok! Recognize that success is being able to read when it’s time and doing so when he or she finds it necessary to work on what he or she does love.

It’s never too late to start if you feel like your child is not a successful reader. At any age, you can work in the books and I would argue that it’s worth the time it will take to make a new effort.

More Posts about Reading on Blog, She Wrote

Blog, She Wrote The Ultimate Guide to Establishing a Reading Culture in Your Home

Focusing on the power of reading for long term value in a child’s life, is a great priority for homeschoolers and traditional schoolers alike.

Why a Good Book is Like a Secret Door

A great way to approach growing a reader is to figure out how to make books real to kids. As our young kids grow older, the way to make them real changes but it’s always about how to help students engage with a book and to help them take something away from it. We have daily spirited conversations about the contents of books whether it’s an assigned reading, something our kids are reading on their own, or something they’ve been digging into for class or book club.

I came across this TED Talk on Why a Good Book is Like a Secret Door and I thought it summed up our experiences with books pretty well. It’s worth the 15 minutes to add a little whimsy and imagination to your day.

Will you be intentional about opening the door to reading for your students? How will you help your students to find the secret doors? Once you find them, will you invite the story world into your own, so that the book discussions can continue?

Make books an integral part of your family culture and watch your kids bloom into readers. Academically, it’s the biggest investment you can make.

Today other bloggers at the iHN are writing about Growing Successes. You’ll find encouragement in every post!

GrowingaSuccess

 

facebooktwittergoogle_pluspinterestmailby feather

The post How to Grow a Reader appeared first on Blog, She Wrote.

]]>
http://blogshewrote.org/2015/02/16/growing-reader/feed/ 5
Geography Quest: Great Backyard Bird Count Editionhttp://blogshewrote.org/2015/02/13/geography-quest-great-backyard-bird-count-edition/ http://blogshewrote.org/2015/02/13/geography-quest-great-backyard-bird-count-edition/#comments Fri, 13 Feb 2015 10:22:50 +0000 http://blogshewrote.org/?p=12837   This post contains affiliate links. Thanks for your support! It’s that time of year again! When families everywhere will be counting the birds that come to their yards in the Great Backyard Bird Count (GBBC) sponsored by The Cornell Lab of Ornithology, Audubon Society, and Bird Studies Canada. This year’s count takes place on […]

The post Geography Quest: Great Backyard Bird Count Edition appeared first on Blog, She Wrote.

]]>
 

Geography Quest Great Backyard Bird Count Edition

This post contains affiliate links. Thanks for your support!

It’s that time of year again! When families everywhere will be counting the birds that come to their yards in the Great Backyard Bird Count (GBBC) sponsored by The Cornell Lab of Ornithology, Audubon Society, and Bird Studies Canada. This year’s count takes place on February 13- 16, 2015.

Observe & Submit Your Bird Checklist

Have you participated in the GBBC before? If not, you can read all about how to get started. It’s a pretty easy gig:

  • Register or log in for the count.
  • Count birds for at least 15 minutes a day on one or more days of the GBBC.
  • You can count for longer than 15 minutes and you can count birds on as many days and in as many places as you’d like during the GBBC.
  • Read the directionsfor submitting the checklists using the checklist page or the new app.
  • Do you regularly use eBird? eBird is another website where you can submit bird sightings year round. If you are already an eBird user, please use your eBird account and your observations during these dates will count toward the GBBC. That is great information because I did not know that.

Use GBBC Data to Map The Results

Did you know you can access historical data on the GBBC? This would be a fun map making adventure.

  • There a few map options available to explore on the website.
  • Toggle between top ten lists for species and the map room to find what to map.
  • Pick a favorite bird species and map its populations in North America- or name any location.
  • Observe the data and see if you can find winter patterns or to see if any migration patterns emerge.
  • Look to see if there are patterns in the activity of a species using the places page.
  • What other types of maps could you make using the data from the GBBC? Tell us about them!

Resources for the GBBC

Need some help to keep things easy? Here are a few resources made available by the folks with the GBBC.

  • Create your own tally sheet.
  • A downloadable pdf data form
  • Birding apps recommended by the GBBC- this makes it easy to keep track of the birds you see and you can use it to log your results when the count is complete.
  • iBird Pro mobile bird guide- It’s got a thorough library of bird species information, calls, pictures, etc. This is one of the few apps I’ve paid for for my phone!
  • Merlin- this is a new app by the Cornell Lab of Ornithology. This looks pretty good although it’s not available for Android until the spring. Bummer! It’s a bird ID guide- I saw the prototype at the lab a couple years ago and it’s fun to use.

Join us this weekend to count some backyard birds and submit your results to the GBBC. Our feeder needs filling before we get more snow tomorrow. We see a bunch of birds daily out there enjoying our black oil sunflower seeds. I’m looking forward to officially tallying them this weekend.
Bird Notebook Pages | Harrington Harmonies Need a great way to record your birds during the count? Check out these bird notebooking pages from Harrington Harmonies.

 

 

facebooktwittergoogle_pluspinterestmailby feather

The post Geography Quest: Great Backyard Bird Count Edition appeared first on Blog, She Wrote.

]]>
http://blogshewrote.org/2015/02/13/geography-quest-great-backyard-bird-count-edition/feed/ 4
Finishing Strong- Homeschooling the Middle & High School Years Week 42http://blogshewrote.org/2015/02/11/finishing-strong-homeschooling-middle-high-school-years-week-42/ http://blogshewrote.org/2015/02/11/finishing-strong-homeschooling-middle-high-school-years-week-42/#comments Wed, 11 Feb 2015 11:00:01 +0000 http://blogshewrote.org/?p=17064 It’s Wednesday, which means it’s time for Finishing Strong, the link up that focuses on homeschooling teens. Finishing Strong is co-hosted by: Aspired Living, Blog She Wrote, Education Possible, Eva Varga, & Starts at Eight A big thank you to all who shared posts with us last week. They were wonderful! We’re happy so many […]

The post Finishing Strong- Homeschooling the Middle & High School Years Week 42 appeared first on Blog, She Wrote.

]]>
It’s Wednesday, which means it’s time for Finishing Strong, the link up that focuses on homeschooling teens.

Finishing Strong ~ Homeschooling the Middle & High School Years #42

Finishing Strong is co-hosted by: Aspired Living, Blog She Wrote, Education Possible, Eva Varga, & Starts at Eight

A big thank you to all who shared posts with us last week. They were wonderful! We’re happy so many of you were here to help us start the New Year – even if we were a bit late!

We’re thrilled to back to our regular schedule, sharing some of the best tips for thriving during the middle & high school years. Make sure to keep reading to see what new ideas get linked up this week.

Did you get the chance to read these posts from last week? They were some of our reader’s favorites.

Tudors and Stuarts: Explorers – Making a Paper Mache Map of the World from Angelicscalliwags

Edgar Allen Poe Lesson Plans for High School Students from Layered Soul

Homeschool Planner for Teens from Royal Little Lambs

How to Edit and Grade Writing – Grading High School Papers from WriteShop

Do you have a great post of your own that highlights schooling older kids at home? Share it below!

Bloggers, by linking up, you may be featured on our co-hosts’ social media pages or our Pinterest board. We may even select you to be featured in a future post!

Guidelines for the hop:

  1. Link up to 3 posts from your blog. Make sure you use the exact URL to the post, not to your home page. You can add any post related to homeschooling middle and high school students. Posts unrelated to that will be removed.
  2. Please no advertising, individual Pinterest pins, Facebook, Twitter, or other link-up links!
  3. Grab our button to add to your post after you link it up. Each week we will be choosing our favorite posts to highlight on all 5 sites. If you were featured, make sure you add an “I was featured” button.
  4. The linky will go live on each co-host’s blog each Wednesday at 6am EST, and will be live until Tuesday at 11:55 pm.

Share the love.

Add our button to your post.

Homeschooling the Middle & High School Years

Was your post featured?

Grab an “I was featured” button!

Homeschooling the Middle & High School Years

We love people who SHARE WITH US!

*By linking up, you agree for us to share your images, always with credit!

So tell us, what have you been up to?

We want to see your best posts that focus on homeschooling middle & high school students. Share your ideas, unique learning approaches, and encouragement.

 Loading InLinkz ...
facebooktwittergoogle_pluspinterestmailby feather

The post Finishing Strong- Homeschooling the Middle & High School Years Week 42 appeared first on Blog, She Wrote.

]]> http://blogshewrote.org/2015/02/11/finishing-strong-homeschooling-middle-high-school-years-week-42/feed/ 2 How to Keep Up with an Accelerated Readerhttp://blogshewrote.org/2015/02/09/keep-accelerated-reader/ http://blogshewrote.org/2015/02/09/keep-accelerated-reader/#comments Mon, 09 Feb 2015 11:00:28 +0000 http://blogshewrote.org/?p=17031 This post contains affiliate links. Thanks for your support! If you’ve ever had an accelerated reader in your home, then you know it is a challenge to keep up with what they read and to keep them in books. They read everything and anything they can get their hands on and as a parent you […]

The post How to Keep Up with an Accelerated Reader appeared first on Blog, She Wrote.

]]>
Blog, She Wrote How to Keep up with an Accelerated Reader

This post contains affiliate links. Thanks for your support!

If you’ve ever had an accelerated reader in your home, then you know it is a challenge to keep up with what they read and to keep them in books. They read everything and anything they can get their hands on and as a parent you are constantly on the search for a good read for your child. Today’s post is all about How to Keep Up with an Accelerated Reader.

Do You Have an Accelerated Reader?

The simple definition of an accelerated reader is someone who reads well at an early age. All of our kids are accelerated readers. They tackled big books at a young age. The biggest challenge of having an accelerated reader comes when they are young. The older your readers get, the easier it is.

It’s important to point out though,  that typically we think of early readers as being “accelerated” readers. They head out of the starting gate at a full run and keep a steady pace. Keeping them in good supply of appropriately challenging books is a key to nurturing the early start.

However, you can have accelerated readers that begin reading more on a typical schedule for emerging readers. Once they catch on, they begin to read everything in sight and just because they didn’t start super early doesn’t mean they haven’t caught up to the fast pace of reading books and don’t have the capability to read more difficult books. Some of our children fall in to this category.

Blog, She Wrote How to Keep up with an Accelerated Reader

The Challenge of Having an Accelerated Reader

In my experience, there are three things that present the most difficult hurdle when you have a student who reads voraciously.

  • Finding books that are emotionally appropriate for their reading level & still a challenging read for them. Just because a student can read what kids in high school are reading when he is 6, doesn’t mean he should. Worse than reading books that are no longer challenging, is reading books that are inappropriate for kids of a younger age.
  • Pre-reading fast enough to find out if a book is off the mark for your child or not. Accelerated readers need new books all the time. Keeping up with them is difficult.
  • As they grow, they get more discerning. This is actually true of any reader who has been exposed to good books whether or not they are ahead of the reading game. I have observed over the years as my children have read a lot of good books, they have little tolerance for books which are not.

As Gladys Hunt says in Honey for a Teen’s Heart,

Excellence has a way of eliminating inferior products.

In practical terms, this means that finding a good book gets a little harder especially since they read so quickly! That’s all the more reason to find a good source of information on books.

Strategies for Managing an Accelerated Reader

  • Pre-Read Books You’d Like Your Student to Read- At our house, my husband is the pre-reader. Unencumbered with the daily tasks of homeschooling and being a fast reader makes him a prime candidate for this job. If I see a book or series of books that I think might be appropriate, I bring it home and set him to work. In one evening he’ll be able to tell whether or not our younger kids should try the book. He’s read a lot of good books over the years and it gives our children the incentive to read his suggestions. Once their dad has read it, then they know that he can share what’s going on in that good book with them. We’ve seen some wonderful conversations over the years that have begun because of a book they’ve shared together. I’ll share more about book discussions in another post.
  • Ask Around about Books- If you don’t have a good system in place for pre-reading, then there are other ways to be more certain about a book choice. One is to ask around. Ask family, friends, and online homeschooling forum/Facebook buddies about a book. Chances are someone has some experience with it and can tell you about the book. It’s important to take information from others and discern for yourselves if a book is right for your family.
  • Read Books about Books- Another way is to get your hands on some books about books. These authors have specialized in sharing good books with their audience. I’ve got a list of our favorites below.

Blog She Wrote How to Keep Up with an Accelerated Reader

Books about Books

A post on voracious readers would be incomplete without some information on books! This is a list of books which have annotated bibliographies in them telling you something about the good books on their list. These are my favorites:

Resources for Raising Readers

Reading & books is a significant part of our homeschool culture. Below you’ll find other valuable posts on reading here at Blog, She Wrote along with a few Pinterest boards on the topic.

Nurturing our good readers means having a print rich environment and making sure that trips to the library are a priority. We have had so many books home from the library at our house sometimes we wonder if there are enough still on the shelves for others! I’m sure this is a familiar scene in the homes of most homeschoolers. Keeping track of which books come home and steering them toward the good stuff is the task at hand.

I encourage you to find the resources you need to help your kids make good decisions about books. If you should happen to make a poor judgment, all is not lost. Sometimes those less than discerning moments give us opportunities to have good discussions with our kids.

Enjoy the journey with your accelerated reader. Chances are they will take you to places you’ve not been before through their adventures with books and it gives you as the parent a special role as adventure guide.

 

facebooktwittergoogle_pluspinterestmailby feather

The post How to Keep Up with an Accelerated Reader appeared first on Blog, She Wrote.

]]>
http://blogshewrote.org/2015/02/09/keep-accelerated-reader/feed/ 8
How to Plan Five in a Rowhttp://blogshewrote.org/2015/02/06/planning-five-in-a-row/ http://blogshewrote.org/2015/02/06/planning-five-in-a-row/#comments Fri, 06 Feb 2015 11:00:00 +0000 http://blogshewrote.wordpress.com/2009/09/17/planning-five-in-a-row If you’ve been a long time reader, then you know we are a Five in a Row family. In fact, we use Five in a Row at different levels through middle school. In the early years, we used it exclusively and our oldest used it all the way through middle school. The other three kids […]

The post How to Plan Five in a Row appeared first on Blog, She Wrote.

]]>
Blog, She Wrote How to Plan Five in a Row

If you’ve been a long time reader, then you know we are a Five in a Row family. In fact, we use Five in a Row at different levels through middle school. In the early years, we used it exclusively and our oldest used it all the way through middle school. The other three kids have used Five in a Row for many years in addition to other unit studies through middle school. Our youngest has done Five in a Row on his own and  as a “tag along”. Although our children are older now and we are pursuing our own independent & authentic brand of homeschooling, Five in a Row has been the curriculum foundation of our homeschool.

I used to get asked a lot how I managed the planning and implementation of Five in a Row (FIAR). After seeing more recent comments and concerns about planning from FIAR users, I decided it was time to give this old post new life. How to Plan Five in a Row is all about how to keep things simple in order to use FIAR to its fullest potential with your family.

Five in a Row Planning Tips

First of all relax! Whatever you choose from the manual will be wonderful and will make an effective week of school. Forget the “extras”. Jane Lambert did not write a curriculum which would require more than her lessons for the areas outside reading and math instruction. The beauty of FIAR is the way it captures for children a broad base of knowledge which they can draw on in the future. They’ll have more prior knowledge to access later on.

Blog, She Wrote How to Plan Five in a Row

Read the Front Matter in Your Manuals- There is a wealth of information there on how to organize information your children learn, what materials you need, what sorts of notebooks to try, and other helpful hints from the author.

Sit down sometime before the week begins and look through the manual. I choose two to three lessons for each topic for our week. Generally, I go for one longer lesson and one shorter one for each subject. I gather the materials for them ahead of time. One thing that can end a good school session is not being prepared! This is especially true when you have young children who will wander off if you don’t keep them engaged.

Choose activities for a day based on what your week is like. I don’t plan heavy things for days when we are not going to have much time. Seems obvious, but if you think a lesson might not happen on a particular day, it probably won’t! So don’t set yourself up for failure from the start. Choose shorter lessons or those which are more conversational.

Have a Conversation. If this is hard for you, then go for the more concrete lessons until you have more of a rhythm reading to the kids. Once you are more at ease with the reading part, the conversations will come. They don’t have to follow the book either. You can read the book and be sitting down to lunch later in the day and say, “Hey remember when?” and bring it up at that time. It’s always good practice to get your kids thinking about a book and to talk about it all the time. Think about what would be easy for you to try out and go for it. This works for teens too! One of the best ways to communicate with your teen is through the books they are reading. Start early!

Find a way to record your lesson plans- I use a plain spiral notebook for planning. It’s easy and doesn’t have a lot of overhead. There are no blank spaces to try and fill. With two high schoolers, a middle schooler, and one elementary student, I still use a plain spiral! I don’t have one spiral for four kids anymore, but it is still the best planner I’ve ever used.

Prepare Your Own Papers Based on Lessons- Rather than looking for a printable, I would grab a sheet of paper and write, “Metaphors” at the top if the lesson asked the student to write her own metaphor. Printables are fun, but they take time to find, sometimes cost money, and they must be stored or kept track of prior to using them. Grabbing a sheet of paper and writing the assignment with ruler lines for writing on takes only a few moments.

Store the things you prepare ahead of time. Again, I refer back to an earlier point that being unprepared for the teachable moment stinks! Sometimes you want the printable, then you have to have it on hand when you need it. I’ve used various systems over the years. However, I try not to print anything more than a day or so ahead. If you know that won’t work for you, then have a binder where you keep the printed material until they are needed. It will save you headaches later.

Try at least one lesson for every subject. You’ll be tempted to skip ones that don’t appeal to you and/or you are intimidated by. Be sure to choose lessons from every subject area or you will begin to feel like something is missing. For example, if you skip over the art lessons all the time you’ll find yourself down the road going…FIAR doesn’t seem to have art or you’ll begin to think you need an art supplement. Trust me…I hear it over and over from FIAR users. My feeling is that it’s all there IF you choose to implement the lessons.

Resist the Urge to Plan Large Themes- Lots of people want to incorporate themes to their FIAR studies. It’s not necessary and it’s somewhat undesirable to do all of one kind of book at once. Grouping winter books or books on one country, etc might seem fun and the best way to organize your studies, but I don’t find it to be the ideal scenario. Part of the magic in using FIAR is revisiting topics along the way and adding more knowledge to what they learned the first time around. One of the things I love best about FIAR is the variety! Sure study Snowflake Bentley in the winter as opposed to summer, but don’t feel like you have to do Katy & the Big Snow, Snowflake Bentley, The Very Last First Time, and The Snow Day all in the same month. You and your children will have more than one winter during their FIAR years. Take them as they come!

General Homeschool Planning Tips

This advice goes for any curriculum you are using. Sometimes we like to keep things too complicated when there is beauty in simplicity.

Blog, She Wrote Planning Five in a Row

Read Aloud- is one of my favorite things to do! Have you ever read, The Read Aloud Handbook by Jim Trelease? EXCELLENT read and it will boost your confidence that your efforts are well worth it. We have had (and still do) many enjoyable hours reading aloud to our children. The more you do it, the more you get used to it and the better at it you become. Reading extra books about the people, places, and concepts related to your FIAR book is easy to do. You don’t have to find or read every book out there. A few is perfect.  To this day, nothing soothes the students in our house like a read aloud. Nothing.

Keep it simple- You might be tempted to add in gobs of lapbooking and extras. My advice is to stick with Jane’s lessons. I made my own copywork sheets using my student’s thoughts and ideas. I used StartWrite software to make things for my kids to write on in a lesson. For example, when we did Owl Moon that year, I had my then 6yo give me owl facts using some owl words I had given him on paper strips. As he dictated his sentences to me, I typed them into StartWrite and then he used his own sentences as copy work. It’s not sophisticated, but it’s a great copywork assignment.

You will likely not get done everything you planned. What’s important about that is…that it’s ok. Maybe you will find another trail to explore or one of the activities will strike your kids’ fancy and you’ll play that out a lot and not so much others.

Be consistent. Get up and do school every day or most days. You will catch a groove. There is no perfect way to do the job. There are no perfect times. Just get started and do it each day. Things will become easier. You’ll start to see a rhythm. When you do, you’ll be able to see how things can be tweaked to suit your needs. You’ll know when something needs changing.

Other Planning Links & Book Links from Blog, She Wrote

The Ultimate Guide to Establishing a Reading Culture in Your Home

You might like some other planning related posts and posts that compliment the Five in a Row experience. FIAR involves multiple ages and a lot of families wonder how to manage various volumes. Early on I decided it was best to move where my kids needed to be and not worry about “staying together”. It is more work, but we also come together during the day. Since reading and books is a big part of FIAR, I’ve included a post on building a reading culture in your home.

Families worry that FIAR can’t possibly be enough or they lament the time it takes to plan. On the contrary, I have always found it to be fairly straightforward and I followed my kids’ lead. Resist the temptation to believe it has to more than what it already is! For the record, our kids grew up on FIAR and they are thriving in high school. Be encouraged!

Last but not least, Have FUN! FIAR is designed to be a relaxed, relationship building program for you and your kids which will give your children a love learning that will last a lifetime. Panic is not part of the package the Lamberts intend to sell. Enjoy it!

facebooktwittergoogle_pluspinterestmailby feather

The post How to Plan Five in a Row appeared first on Blog, She Wrote.

]]>
http://blogshewrote.org/2015/02/06/planning-five-in-a-row/feed/ 16